Do you want to be a winner in CPA Marketing?

This post is not written by me, but written by one of our success graduates who have crossed the 6 figure mark in CPA marketing in less than one year and he has now successfully quit his full time job to stay at home and work on his CPA business.
I hope this post can serve as a inspiration and motivation for you.
—————————————————————
Just to share with people who are still looking for their first
profitable campaign based on my own experience in CPA.
Difference between WINNER and LOSER in the following aspects in testing phase:
(1) Mindset
– WINNER: Never afraid of losing money during testing. It is just another
data collection if the campaign is not working at this moment. Come back and
re-test in future.
– LOSER: Losing $5 – $10 is a big deal. Scared of losing more money.
(2) Budget
– WINNER: Have larger budget for testing according to the payout of offer.
e.g.: for an offer with the payout of $100, testing budget would be $200 – $500.
– LOSER: Only use the same budget to test all kinds of offer regardless the offer payout.
(3) Testing method
WINNER: Always use a systematic approach in testing. Work on one method
thoroughly before moving to another method.
LOSER: Have a messy testing method. Jumping from one method to another.
(4) Day parting
WINNER: Tend to define day parting even in the beginning of the testing
according to the offer.
LOSER: Do not take note about the time and activate testing campaigns at
the wrong hour (burn the budget without any conversion).
(5) KW / URL research
WINNER: Go into deep KW / URL research. Find a lot of ways to get the
closer or more relevant KW / URL.
LOSER: Use only KW / URL scraper and think that money would flow in like
water with only this simple set of KW / URL.
(6) Data analysis
WINNER: Spend time in analysing data collected from the testing
(even for non-converting campaigns).
Try to get as much information as possible from the testing to determine
whether to go deeper to optimise or to move on to the next offer.
LOSER: Never analyse data properly and discard the data once the campaign is not
converting at all.
Check if you have any behaviour of LOSER. Try to change it.
Hope more people here could do better and not to give up easily.
P.S.: Of course there is no free lunch in the world. Every successful affiliate
has spent long hours and huge testing budget to make things work.
————————————————————————

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Do you want to be a winner in CPA Marketing?

This post is not written by me, but written by one of our success graduates who have crossed the 6 figure mark in CPA marketing in less than one year and he has now successfully quit his full time job to stay at home and work on his CPA business.
I hope this post can serve as a inspiration and motivation for you.
—————————————————————
Just to share with people who are still looking for their first
profitable campaign based on my own experience in CPA.
Difference between WINNER and LOSER in the following aspects in testing phase:
(1) Mindset
– WINNER: Never afraid of losing money during testing. It is just another
data collection if the campaign is not working at this moment. Come back and
re-test in future.
– LOSER: Losing $5 – $10 is a big deal. Scared of losing more money.
(2) Budget
– WINNER: Have larger budget for testing according to the payout of offer.
e.g.: for an offer with the payout of $100, testing budget would be $200 – $500.
– LOSER: Only use the same budget to test all kinds of offer regardless the offer payout.
(3) Testing method
WINNER: Always use a systematic approach in testing. Work on one method
thoroughly before moving to another method.
LOSER: Have a messy testing method. Jumping from one method to another.
(4) Day parting
WINNER: Tend to define day parting even in the beginning of the testing
according to the offer.
LOSER: Do not take note about the time and activate testing campaigns at
the wrong hour (burn the budget without any conversion).
(5) KW / URL research
WINNER: Go into deep KW / URL research. Find a lot of ways to get the
closer or more relevant KW / URL.
LOSER: Use only KW / URL scraper and think that money would flow in like
water with only this simple set of KW / URL.
(6) Data analysis
WINNER: Spend time in analysing data collected from the testing
(even for non-converting campaigns).
Try to get as much information as possible from the testing to determine
whether to go deeper to optimise or to move on to the next offer.
LOSER: Never analyse data properly and discard the data once the campaign is not
converting at all.
Check if you have any behaviour of LOSER. Try to change it.
Hope more people here could do better and not to give up easily.
P.S.: Of course there is no free lunch in the world. Every successful affiliate
has spent long hours and huge testing budget to make things work.
————————————————————————

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5 Time Saving IFTTT Recipes

I am a sucker for automation. I spend a lot of time in a variety of tools that help to automate some of the more mundane tasks that I have to accomplish on a daily basis. While we will talk about all of those tools in the future, today we’re going to focus on just one, IFTTT. For those of you who have not yet been exposed to IFTTT, it stands for “If This Then That” and it is useful to pretty much anyone who uses…the internet. Seriously, if you do anything online then odds are you can put IFTTT to work for you. I have been using it for some time now, and today im going to talk about some of the “Recipes” that I find the most helpful.

Before we get into specifics, lets talk quickly about the process of creating a recipe with IFTTT. The first thing that you’re going to have to do is specify a trigger. The trigger is the jumping off point for the recipe. Its what lets IFTTT know that you want something to happen. Examples include: new RSS feed item, new favorite tweet, calendar event starts, time and date, etc. Once you’ve settled on when you want something to happen you have to specify the action to take. Actions could be things like: sending you an email, creating a note in Evernote, saving data to a spreadsheet, or sending yourself a text message. There are hundreds (maybe thousands) of different triggers and actions. Today we’re only going to touch on a few, but hopefully we can get your createive juices flowing and you’ll be able to envision exactly how you might want to utilize this service in your own life. Lets get started.

1. Trigger – New event gets added to my Google calendar Action – Create a new note in Evernote

 

gcal evernote 5 Time Saving IFTTT Recipes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is one of my favorite recipes because it allows me to streamline the note taking process for all of my meetings that get put on my calendar. As a software engineer my meetings consist of things like: standups, sprint planning, retrospectives, client kickoffs, and code reviews. Before I had this process I would take notes on whatever app was open at the time: Sublime text, stickies, text edit, sometimes Evernote, or simply not take notes at all. With that system I was able to take notes (for the most part) but I rarely had all of the the context necessary to make them as useful as possible. Things like: start/end times, other attendes, original description, etc. So what does this recipe do? Well as the title implies, everytime I accept a calendar invite, IFTTT creates a note for me in Evernote that includes all of the basics, as well as a place for all of my notes. No longer do I have to worry about taking notes in my text editor, and putting them in Evernote. Now whenever I have a meeting, I open up Evernote and boom, there’s a meeting note waiting for me that I can work off of. As an added benefit I can use these notes as part of my timeline to see what I was doing on a given day.

2. Trigger – New Foursquare checking – Action – Create a new note in Evernote

foursquare evernote 5 Time Saving IFTTT Recipes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I went over my lifelogging process in detail here, but heres the long and the short of it. I use Swarm (formerly Foursquare) to check in everywhere i go. From Best Buy to Peter Luegers and everywhere in between, if i’m there, I check in. Once I do that I have IFTTT automatically create a note that contains all of that check in information. This is great for looking back at where you’ve been and what you’ve done. I also double down on this recipe and have IFTTT create a new calendar event in my Google calendar for each checkin. This allows me to more easily look back at where i’ve been when perusing my calendar.

3. Trigger – New “How I Work” post – Action – Email me

lifehacker email 5 Time Saving IFTTT Recipes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I LOVE the Lifehacker.com “How I Work” series where they take people from all industries and ask them to bare all with regards to how they do what they do. If you’ve never checked it out before I highly recommend reading some of the past posts. You’re all but guaranteed to pickup something from each one you read. Given my love for these articles this recipe should come as no great surprise. I have IFTTT monitor the Lifehacker RSS feed and whenever an article is posted that includes the words “How I Work”, IFTTT emails me to let me know that a new one has been published. This lets me get right into the content without having to constantly check their site to look for the latest in the series.

4. Trigger – New Automatic trip data – Action – New row in Google spreadsheet

automatic googledrive 5 Time Saving IFTTT Recipes

 

 

 

 

 

 

As a proponent of the quantified self movement I am a big fan of the Automatic. Automatic is a devices that plugs into your cars onboard computer system and monitors your trips and alerts you when you’re driving in a way that is not gas efficient. With this recipe everytime I complete a trip IFTTT creates a new row in the Google Drive spreadsheet that I have for my Automatic. This allows me to more easily go back to look at trips, and is especially helpful for longer distances so that I can see how much it cost me to drive from A to B. Automatic is constantly improving their product and if you haven’t tried it yet I strongly recommend picking one up.

5. Trigger – Fitbit Daily Summary – Action – New note in Evernote

fitbit evernote 5 Time Saving IFTTT Recipes

 

 

 

 

 

 

In case you haven’t noticed, I love Evernote and I try to put as much stuff in there as possible, this recipe is an extension of that. I currently wear a Fitbit flex and with IFTTT I am able to take the data that it collects and put it into my Evernote at the end of each day. This serves to give me even more context when I look back at notes for a given period in time.

 

So now that we’ve gone over some of my top uses for IFTTT, what about you? Is it something you use? What are some of your favorite recipes? Let me know on Twitter, in the comments, or email me!

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Lifelogging with IFTTT, Evernote, and Swarm

IFTTT Logo Lifelogging with IFTTT, Evernote, and SwarmCall me crazy, but I like to know where I’ve been at different points in my life. Im not talking just on a macro scale either, im talking day by day, hour by hour, where was I and what was I doing on this date, 2 years ago. Why? Its pretty simple, I like to relive days of old whenever the mood strikes. Its fun for me to open up my calendar or Evernote timeline and look back at a date and say “Oh ya, I remember this”. Once you open the box you never know what you might do with it, or where it’ll lead you. Perhaps you come across a dinner you had with an old friend a year ago and seeing the record of it leads you to get back in touch? The possibilites are endless, though for the sake of this article we’re going to focus on how you can automate (mostly) the process of documenting your life.

To get started you’re going to need three things: IFTTT account, Swarm account, Evernote account, and a Google account (optional). Once you’ve got those things we can dive into the process of documenting your life.

Step 1 – Funnel Swarm Checkins to Evernote Automatically

The first step in this process is to head over to IFTTT and setup a recipe for taking your Swarm (formerly FourSquare) checkins and turning them into Evernote notes. Doing this is simple. First click on the “Create” button in the top right hand corner of IFTTT. Once you’re on the create a recipe page you want to first select the trigger which in this case is a FourSquare checkin (they haven’t changed it to Swarm, but it still works, I promise.) Once you’ve got that selected its time to create an action. For this I choose to make an Evernote note that goes into a “Timeline” notebook. The note includes everything that IFTTT puts in there automaticlally with the checkin. At this point you’re pretty much ready to rock and roll.

 

Screenshot 2014 08 20 15.17.49 Lifelogging with IFTTT, Evernote, and Swarm

If you want, you can also elect to create another recipe for storing these checkins as events on your Google calendar. If you’re someone like me who has their Sunrise calendar app open all day, it can be nice to see where you’ve been, at a glance.

Step 2 – Checkin everywhere you go

This is pretty self explanatory but if you don’t do it then you won’t get very much out of what we did in step 1. The point here is that no matter where you go, how long you’re there for, or what you’re doing, you should be checking in using Swarm. I checkin if im buying a light bulb from Lowe’s, just as I do if im having a graudation celebration dinner wth my family. It all goes back into my notebook.

swarm 286x300 Lifelogging with IFTTT, Evernote, and Swarm

One important thing that I like to do when checking in is to provide plenty of context. In Swarm you’re able to add a description, do it. Write down who you’re with, what you’re doing, what is the occasion? Doing this will make step 3 a lot more enjoyable.

Step 3 – Review the data every so often

This last step isn’t really much of a science, its more of a personal preference. Every so often its nice to look back and see where you’ve been, or what you’ve done. I dont have a set schedule for looking over this stuff, but id say that about once a month ill do a review of the past 30 days or so. basically a step by step introduction to how I go about logging all of the events that take place in my life. How do you do it? Is their something I forgot? Let me know!

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How I Buffer Effectively

logo icon How I Buffer EffectivelyFor those of you that don’t already know, Buffer is a social media scheduler that allows you to que up posts for your Twitter, Facebook, and Linkedin accounts weeks/days/months ahead of time. Why is this to useful you may ask? Well for starters, I find it difficult to have to remember to share something at some point in the future. For me personally its easier to share it right away, and then forget about it. The problem there however is that if you spam your followers with tweet after tweet after tweet, you’re going to loose followers, even if the content is spectacular. With Buffer you’re able to combat this by taking the content that you’ve found and sharing it right away (in your mind), and then having it spread out of a period of time.

At this point you’re either already a Buffer user interested in learning how I use it effectively, or someone whos just heard about it for the first time. For those of you in the latter camp, go ahead and sign up, then come back, and we will continue.

My 3 Pronged Approach For Using Buffer Effectively

1. Find great content that is worth sharing
If the stuff that you’re sharing with your followers is largely worthless, then you’re not going to reap any benefits from having shared it. How can you tell if something is worth sharing? Well, much like porn, you know it when you see it. Did you learn something when you read it? Is it something that hasn’t been talked about a million times before? Will its voice resonate with your audience? Is it in a similar niche? These are all questions that you need to ask yourself before deciding what to share.

2. Researching the author, and constructing the share
Step 2 is where, in my opinion, 90% of people fail. They’ve got a got piece of content (or so they think), and so they drop the link into Buffer without ever giving it a second thought. While you could make the argument that doing this is better than doing nothing at all, its still very poor execution. At this point what I do, is lookup the author in Google to find their Twitter handle. Ill then construct a custom message to go along with the link, that includes a hashtag or two, and a mention of the author.

 

Screenshot 2014 08 17 10.53.32 How I Buffer Effectively

The number of replies, favorites, and retweets that I receive when I do it this way as oppposed to simply clicking “Add to Buffer” and doing nothing else, is astounding.

3. Schedule the share at the most opportune time
At this point you’ve got a great piece of content that your followers are sure to love, and you’re constructed a top of the line share that is going to garner more favorites and retweets than a vanilla share. The only thing that is left to do is to make sure that you put that content in front of your audience…..when they’re actually online. If you’re sharing your best stuff at 4am on Sunday then chances are no one is going to see it. What you need to do is use a service such as SocialBro that can run a report and tell you when your followers are most active. Then tune your Buffer schedule to match those times.

Screenshot 2014 08 17 10.57.46 How I Buffer Effectively
My Tweet Times

Recap
Find great content, put some effort into the way it is presented, and share it at an optimal time. If you do this, I promise that your results will be better than if you did not.

Any questions? Leave a comment, or send me an email (I always reply.)

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